Water Softener Rebate Program FAQs

What is a self-regenerating water softener?

Self-regenerating water softeners are water softening systems to which you or a service provider adds salt (sodium or potassium chloride pellets). Water softeners that include a regular service to change out the tank on your conditioners are not considered harmful.

What is the difference between a water softener and a water conditioner?

A water conditioner refers the broad scope of water treatment to suit a particular usage requirement whereas a water softener is a form of water softening that uses ion exchange technology to specifically remove Calcium and Magnesium.

Why should I remove my self-regenerating water softener?

Automatic water softeners, the type to which you add salt (sodium chloride or potassium chloride), produce a salty discharge measured as Total Dissolved Solids (TDS). If levels of TDS become too high the recycled water quality fails to meet the requirements for recycled water established by the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) for beneficial uses.

What are Total Dissolved Solids (TDS)?

TDS is a measure of the amount of dissolved salts and other minerals in water. In the Inland Empire, after water is used in homes and goes down the drain, the wastewater ends up in the sewer system. From there it flows to one of four water recycling plants. Even though these facilities provide a high level of treatment and remove many impurities and pollutants from the wastewater, they are not designed to remove TDS.

How do Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) levels affect recycled water?

Recycled water is our most sustainable and drought-proof water supply. Recycled water provides a safe, cost-effective and reliable supply of high quality water. By using recycled water for specific purposes, IEUA helps our community preserve limited water supplies for drinking water and other household uses. The largest constraint on groundwater and recycled water supplies is the amount of salt in the water: self-regenerating water softeners discharge about one pound of salt per day into the regional sewer. If this does not stop, it will result in additional treatment costs and could significantly increase your sewer bills. For more information about IEUA’s recycled water program, please visit our recycled water department.

Will I save water if I remove my automatic water softener?

Yes. By removing your self-regenerating water softener you can save up to 5000 gallons per year depending on the water quality, age and type of self-regenerating water softener you own.

What type of rebate is offered if I remove my self-regenerating water softener?

To encourage you to remove your automatic water softeners, the IEUA is offering you 100 percent of the reasonable value (between $300-$2,000), plus free removal and disposal. The water softener must be connected and in working condition to qualify for the rebate. If you live in the IEUA service area* you can submit an application form with proof of purchase and the IEUA will send you a letter stating the rebate offer based on the purchase price, make, model, and age of the unit.
*The IEUA serves the Cities of Chino, Chino Hills, Fontana, Montclair, Ontario, Upland and to the Cucamonga Valley Water District, Fontana Water Company, Monte Vista Water District, and the San Antonio Water Company.

How can I obtain proof of purchase for my self-regenerating water softener if I do not have a receipt?

Proof of purchase may be obtained by calling records departments for many of the big box stores such as Home Depot, Lowes and Costco. Companies that install self-regenerating water softeners, such as Culligan, GE, Kenmore (Sears), and Rayne, will also be able to provide you with receipts and purchase information. Credit card companies can also provide back-statements that would include purchase prices.
Without proof of purchase, you can still receive a $300 rebate if the self-regenerating water softener is connected and in working condition.

What options and alternatives are available once I remove my softener?

You can switch to an alternative means of water conditioning, such as an exchange tank water softening system. Some vendors offer non-salt treatment units for water conditioning.
The Sanitation District of Los Angeles County (LACSD) offers a listing of more than 50 alternative water conditioning systems. The site includes reviews from community members on the various products and services. The IEUA does not endorse any particular water conditioning unit, or provide any assurances regarding the effectiveness of any unit.

Who is the IEUA and how can I contact them for more information?

IEUA is a municipal water district that distributes imported water, provides industrial/municipal wastewater collection and treatment services, and other related utility services to the cities of Chino, Chino Hills, Fontana, Montclair, Ontario and Upland, as well as to the Cucamonga Valley Water District, Fontana Water Company, Monte Vista Water District, and the San Antonio Water Company.
If you have any further questions about the self-regenerating water softener rebate program or want more information about recycled water, you may call the IEUA at 909-993-1550 or email at softenerrebate@ieua.org.

If you have any further questions about the self-regenerating water softener rebate program or want more information about recycled water, you may call the IEUA at 909-993-1550 or email at softenerrebate@ieua.org